SC2000 NEWS RELEASES


DALLAS TO HOST WORLD'S LEADERS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE NETWORKING AND COMPUTING WHEN SC2000 CONFERENCE COMES TO TEXAS NOV. 4-10, 2000
 

March 17, 2000

Each November for the past 11 years, 5,000 of the world's leaders in creating and using the planet's most powerful computing and networking tools gather to demonstrate the newest technologies and showcase their results.

This year, SC2000, the conference of high performance networking and computing, will convene in Dallas for seven days of technical programs, technological demonstrations and exhibits, educational outreach and mind-boggling visualizations of computational data. The conference will be held Nov. 4-10 in the Dallas Convention Center.

SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.

"High-performance computing and networking, once the province of a small group of very specialized research institutions, are now ubiquitous in science, education, industry, commerce and other fields," said Louis Turcotte, conference chair of SC2000. "Many of today's taken-for-granted technologies were rolled out at previous SC conferences. It's safe to say that attending SC2000 will be like looking a few years into the technological future."

In fact, two features new to SC conferences will highlight this year's meeting.

The first, called Venture Village, will showcase a collection of entrepreneurial information technology companies, all of which are creating new products to build the infrastructure of tomorrow. The Venture Village will be a specifically designated area located strategically on the main exhibit floor as a complement to the many other vendor and research displays there.

The second innovative thrust is eSCape 2000, demonstrating the ability to "escape" from today's technological boundaries and to log in and compute anywhere. This feature will showcase various technologies now being developed by the world's leading research organizations in high-performance computing and networking. For example, a person using a handheld computer and wireless modem can log into a supercomputer in California, run a massively parallel code using data stored at sites in New York, Iowa and Illinois, and download a 3D simulation of the scientific results at the conference in Dallas.

Here is a schedule of key dates for participating and presenting at SC2000:

  • April 10: The website at www. sc2000.org opens to accept submissions for technical papers, tutorials, education program, panels and Gordon Bell Prize nominations.
  • April 28: Deadline for submissions for technical papers, tutorials, education program, panels and Gordon Bell Prize nominations.
  • May 28: Deadline for applications for Education Program.
  • June 26: Notification of acceptance for technical papers, tutorials, education program and panels.
  • July 28: Submission deadline for eSCape 2000, Research Gems (posters), research exhibits, Birds-of-a-Feather sessions, HPC (High Performance Computing) games and Exhibitor Forum. Student volunteer applications are also due on this date
  • September 1: Notification of acceptance for. eSCape 2000, Research Gems (posters), research exhibits, Birds-of-a-Feather sessions, HPC games and Exhibitor Forum.

For the latest information on SC2000, go to www.sc2000.org


WEB SITE FOR SUBMITTING PROPOSALS FOR SC2000 PROGRAM OPENS MONDAY, APRIL 10
 

April 1, 2000

Submission of proposals for SC2000, the conference of high performance networking and computing, opens Monday, April 10.

All submissions for technical papers, tutorials, education program, panels and Gordon Bell Prize nominations must be made via the website at www.sc2000.org. Submissions in these categories must be made by Friday, April 28. Notification of acceptance for technical papers, tutorials, education program and panels will be made by Monday, June 26.

SC2000 will be held Nov. 4-10, 2000, in the Dallas Convention Center. The conference offers seven days of technical programs, technological demonstrations and exhibits, educational outreach and mind-boggling visualizations of computational data.

SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture (ACM/SIGARCH).


SC2000 CONFERENCE SEEKS HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS FOR TRAINING IN LATEST COMPUTING TECHNOLOGIES
 

April 15, 2000

Rebooting the way science and math is taught in high schools is a multi-step process which recently received a new pair of walking shoes, courtesy of a $1.03 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to a consortium of nine educational institutions will develop a core group of 200 high school math and science teachers trained in the latest computer technologies. The training program begins this fall at SC2000, the annual conference on high-performance networking and computing, to be held Nov. 4-10 in Dallas, Texas.

Teams of teachers to participate in the program will be selected from a national pool of teacher applicant teams. The teams should be formed around two science teachers, one mathematics teacher and one school administrator. Teachers interested in forming one of the four-member teams can learn more about the program and submit applications via the Web at . Applications are due by Monday, May 29, 2000.

Jeffrey C. Huskamp, SC2000-20001 Education Chair and principal investigator for the grant, said the first step of this effort will be to instruct the teachers in using the tools, techniques and technologies of computational science as a way to spark interest and pursue scientific methods in their classrooms.

"Computational science can literally bring unexplored worlds, from subatomic particles to the distant reaches of our universe, into the class room," Huskamp said. "This program will help teachers motivate their students to expand their interest in scientific inquiry and problem solving through hands-on modeling, simulation and visualization. Once they get started, we hope the students will use their knowledge as a springboard to greater discoveries."

The program will draw on the expertise and experience of the consortium members. The consortium includes East Carolina University, the Krell Institute, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Shodor Education Foundation, Inc., and the University of Alabama-Huntsville, as well as the two organizations which sponsor SC2000, the Association for Computing Machinery and the IEEE Computer Society.

The teachers participating in the project will be selected in two groups of 100. The first 100 teachers will attend the SC2000 conference in Dallas Nov. 4- 10 where they will go through five days of professional development in computational science.

After the SC conference, the selected teachers will incorporate those teaching methods into their daily lessons and hone them over the next 18 months. The following summer they will attend a two-week summer program at the University of Alabama at Huntsville. In between, there will be on-line monthly seminars and teleconferences.

In November 2001, the teachers will share their new knowledge with a second group of 100 teachers who will begin a similar regimen at the SC2001 conference.

The teachers will be assisted by members of the Education, Outreach and Training project of the Partnerships for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (EOT-PACI) team and by others involved with the SC2000 and SC2001 conferences.

"We hope that teachers learn to use computational science as a motivator for students not only to learn science and mathematics, but to realize the thrill of scientific inquiry and problem solving," said Edna Gentry of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. ""As a result of teacher and student involvement in computational science, students learn how to apply the scientific method, develop higher order thinking skills, and learn how to communicate better."

The NSF-funded teacher enhancement project is the first to combine the industry leading, high performance computing and networking conference -- the SC Conference -- with the education partnership group -- the EOT-PACI to form a project that will create teacher leaders in computational science across the country. These teachers then take the lead for the incorporation of computational science into their school districts.

Among the expected results is that the project will bring together schools from across the country that have different student populations and different science and mathematics programs to create a repository of information about the best practices that can be utilized by every high school in the country. The SC2000conference is sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery and IEEE Computer Society.


SC2000 CONFERENCE LOOKING FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING APPLICATIONS TO STRETCH HIGH BANDWIDTH INFRASTRUCTURE - STATEMENTS OF INTEREST DUE BY THURSDAY, JUNE 15
 

April 15, 2000

The annual SC conference on high-performance networking and computing has long been a place where high-performance computers and high-speed networks meet. At this year's SC2000 conference, to be held Nov. 4-10 in Dallas, organizers of a special event hope to push the network infrastructure' multi-gigabit links to their limits with demonstrations of leading edge computer applications.

At each year's conference, a special network infrastructure known as SCInet is built. This year's conference will feature a particularly exciting network infrastructure that will include multiple multi-gigabit (OC192) links to the show floor and connections to most high-speed national research networks. In addition, the show floor itself will feature a state-of-the-art wireless network, as part of the eSCape2000 event.

"We hereby challenge the community to show that this unique network can be used to demonstrate exciting applications," said Ian Foster, Associate Division Director of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory and Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Chicago. "To this end, we are soliciting proposals for innovative - especially bandwidth-intensive - application demonstrations.

The general idea is that participants will propose ideas for amazing applications that will both overwhelm the SCInet network infrastructure and deliver innovative application value, Foster said, "and commit to many sleepless nights getting these applications working."

In turn, organizers of the event will provide access to high-speed networks, procurement and installation of specialized equipment, where necessary and feasible, and space and equipment for demonstrations, if needed. Organizers are requesting a statement of intent to participate by Thursday, June 15, to assist with planning, followed by a proposal by Saturday, July 15. Those who make the most effective and/or outrageous use of SCInet resources, as decided by a jury at the SC2000 conference, will be awarded recognition and prizes.

To sign up to participate, send an email (by Thursday, June 15) to sc2000_netchallenge@mcs.anl.gov indicating your interest in participating and outlining what you want to do. By Saturday, July 15, proposals are due. For more information about the high-bandwidth event, go to www-fp.mcs.anl.gov/sc2000_netchallenge/. For more information about the SC2000 conference, go to www.sc2000.org, or contact: media@sc2000.org.


JULY 28 IS SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR VARIOUS RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AT SC2000 CONFERENCE TO BE HELD NOV. 4-10 IN DALLAS
 

July 6, 2000

High performance computing and networking researchers interested in showcasing their achievements at SC2000, the conference of high performance networking and computing, have until Friday, July 28, to submit applications for several key events at the conference.

SC2000 will be held Nov. 4-10 in Dallas, Texas, and provides an opportunity for both researchers and vendors to demonstrate their latest achievements and capabilities. SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture (ACM/SIGARCH). Activities and events subject to the July 28 deadline are:

Research Gems, formerly known as posters, provide an opportunity for researchers to present insights into the solutions of specific research problems in high-performance networking and computing. This category allows the spotlighting of research problems using a traditional poster format or a Web-based presentation, using facilities provided by SC2000. More info is at www.sc2000.org/gems.

HPC Games introduces a new wrinkle this year, the $10K Computer Challenge. Participants are being asked to build their own high-performance computing machine (or machines) for under $10K, and bring these machines to the SC2000 exhibition floor to compete, running a series of predetermined benchmarks. The benchmarks will exercise a balanced assortment of metrics covering CPU performance, disk performance and network performance, and various combinations of these metrics as seen in typical high-performance applications. More info is at www.sc2000.org/games.

Birds-Of-A-Feather Sessions (BOFs) are informal, evening get-togethers where conference attendees can discuss topics of mutual interest. The conference provides meeting-room facilities and posts daily schedules for BOFs. BOFs are open to all conference attendees, including exhibitors and exhibits-only badge holders. Proposals must include a descriptive abstract (150 words), contact information for the organizer, a short description of issues to be addressed and the intended audience, the expected number of participants, any equipment requests, and time preferences. Time slots are made available on a first-come, first-served basis. More info is at www.sc2000.org/bofs.

eSCape 2000 is a new event this year and will explore the concept of "HPC Anywhere." The conference will provide a wireless infrastructure as part of SCinet to serve as a showcase for demonstrations of novel interfaces to HPC resources, data, and applications. The tone of the event is that of a demonstration - not a competition - and the goal is to provide a forum for stimulating broad community discussions about how these new technologies will impact HPC. Participants are invited to demonstrate applications and technologies that they feel best illustrate how being able to reach "HPC Anywhere" will impact supercomputing and the people and industries that depend on supercomputing.

The eSCape2000 event will be organized as a combination forum/permanent exhibit. In order to encourage participation by the largest possible mix of conference attendees, eSCape 2000 events will be held on a reserved area of the exhibit floor. Participants will each be allotted 25 minutes during the exhibition for a presentation and demonstration of their research projects. In addition, each team will be provided space within the eSCape 2000 area to set up a permanent poster describing their project. More info is at www.sc2000.org/escape2000.

Student Volunteer applications are also due by July 28. Student volunteers help out with the administration of the conference in exchange for free conference registration, housing, most meals, conference goodies and more. SC asks for a total of 20-25 hours of work. Students will interact with the conference organizers and presenters and meet other students from all over the world. Student volunteers have the opportunity to see and discuss the latest high-performance networking and computing technology and meet leading researchers from around the world while contributing to the success of this annual event. Details can be found at www.sc2000.org/students/.

More information about all aspects of the SC2000 conference can be found on the Web at www.sc2000.org.


ESCAPE 2000 EVENT AT SC2000 CONFERENCE IN DALLAS TO SHOWCASE ABILITY TO OBTAIN HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING ANYWHERE, ANYTIME
 

July 12, 2000

For many computer users, the ability to log on and check their email from anywhere represents the latest in computing technology.

Now, imagine a point in the future where a person using a handheld computer and wireless modem can log into a supercomputer in California, run a massively parallel code using data stored at sites in New York, Iowa and Illinois, and download a 3D simulation of the scientific results at a conference in Texas.

Such a scenario isn't just the stuff of the future, but will be a centerpiece of SC2000, the annual conference of high-performance networking and computing, to be held Nov. 4-10 in Dallas, Texas.

Known as eSCape 2000, this demonstration of the ability to compute anywhere will showcase various technologies now being developed by the world's leading R&D organizations in high-performance computing and networking. Organizations and researchers interested in participating in demonstrations of such capabilities need to submit their proposals by Friday, July 28. Instructions and more information can be found on the Web at www.sc2000.org/escape2000.

"eSCape 2000 is really about escaping today's technological boundaries and making the nation's computing and networking resources more productive to more people," said Stephen Jones of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center and co-chair of eSCape 2000. "Many of the computing technologies taken for granted today were initially demonstrated at past SC conferences, and we believe what will be shown in Dallas in November will again portend what will be commonplace in the future."

eSCape 2000 is set to demonstrate how palm-sized computing and wireless communication will dramatically change the technology landscape. The convergence of these technologies creates new opportunities in high-performance computing, a field once relegated to a handful of supercomputer centers.

Using the latest technologies, eSCape 2000 will demonstrate the possibility of ubiquitous access to the nation's high performance computing infrastructure. This means extending the human-computer interface out from the desktop, allowing users to integrate computing, data exploration and understanding, and access to large data warehouses as part of their daily activities.

Participants are invited to demonstrate applications and technologies that they feel best illustrate how being able to reach "HPC Anywhere" will impact supercomputing and the people and industries that depend on supercomputing. The event will be organized as a combination forum/permanent exhibit, and participants will each be allotted 25 minutes for a presentation and demonstration of their research project.

The SC2000 conference will provide a wireless infrastructure to serve as a showcase for demonstrations of novel interfaces to high-performance computing resources, data and applications.

Additionally, SC2000 will include two days of tutorials by the leading experts in the field, as well as three days of technical presentations highlighting new technologies, applications and results. The conference will also feature exhibits by the world's leading manufacturers of high-performance computing and networking hardware and software. There will also be displays by many of the nation's leading research institutions which are putting those technologies to work to advance scientific knowledge, enhance education and open new opportunities for research and development.

For more information about SC2000, go to www.sc2000.org To learn more about eSCape 2000 go to www.sc2000.org/escape2000.


REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR SC2000, THE CONFERENCE OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING AND NETWORKING. DALLAS TO HOST SC2000 CONFERENCE NOV. 4-10, 2000
 

July 26, 2000

Registration is now open for SC2000, the annual conference of high performance networking and computing. This year's conference will convene in Dallas, Texas, for seven days of technical programs, technological demonstrations and exhibits, and educational outreach.

The conference will be held Nov. 4-10 in the Dallas Convention Center. SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.

Attendees who register in advance benefit from lower fees and may pick up their conference materials at the Dallas Convention Center beginning Saturday, Nov. 4, 2000. On-line registration information can be found at www.sc2000.org/register. For questions regarding registration, please contact register@computer.org.

In addition to the conference's program of technical presentations and technology displays, two features new to SC conferences will highlight this year's meeting.

The first, called Venture Village, will showcase a collection of entrepreneurial information technology companies, all of which are creating new products to build the infrastructure of tomorrow. The Venture Village will be a specifically designated area located strategically on the main exhibit floor as a complement to the many other vendor and research displays there.

The second innovative thrust is eSCape 2000, demonstrating the ability to "escape" from today's technological boundaries and to log in and compute anywhere. This feature will showcase various technologies now being developed by the world's leading research organizations in high-performance computing and networking. For example, a person using a handheld computer and wireless modem can log into a supercomputer in California, run a massively parallel code using data stored at sites in New York, Iowa and Illinois, and download a 3D simulation of the scientific results at the conference in Dallas.

For more information about the SC2000 conference, go to www.sc2000.org .


SC2000 CONFERENCE REACHES $1 MILLION MILESTONE IN SALES OF COMMERCIAL AND RESEARCH EXHIBIT SPACE
 

August 29, 2000

DALLAS, Texas - SC2000, the conference of high performance networking and computing, has nearly sold out exhibitor space in the Dallas Convention Center, making the Nov. 4-10 conference the most successful in its 12-year history.

Total sales of exhibit space in the convention center have reached the $1 million mark and have exceeded the amount of area originally allocated for exhibits. The SC conference consists of several parallel programs - the commercial and research exhibits by the world's top computer and network vendors, three days of technical presentations, two days of specialized tutorials, and a weeklong education program for teachers from around the country.

"Even by Texas standards, SC2000 is shaping up as one heck of a big conference," said Louis Turcotte, chairman of this year's conference. "It's particularly exciting that so many exhibitors are increasing the size of their exhibits over previous years. Although the field of high performance computing has changed dramatically over the past decade, the response to SC2000 points to a very vibrant future."

The annual conference typically draws 5,000 of the world's leaders in creating and using the planet's most powerful computing and networking tools gather to demonstrate the newest technologies and showcase their results. Registration is now open and can be done via the Web at http://www.sc2000.org/. SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.

To learn more, or to register for SC2000, go to the conference Web site at www.sc2000.org .


SC2000 CONFERENCE ISSUES CHALLENGE: WHO CAN BUILD THE FASTEST COMPUTER FOR $10,000 OR LESS
 

September 16, 2000

Building your own computer has long been a way to make a name for yourself in the high-technology business and at this year's SC2000 conference on high-performance computing and networking, teams from around the country will compete to see who can build the fastest computer for $10,000.

This year, SC2000 will convene in Dallas for seven days of technical programs, technological demonstrations and exhibits, educational outreach and mind-boggling visualizations of computational data. The conference will be held Nov. 4-10 in the Dallas Convention Center.

A hallmark of the SC conference, now in its 12th year, is a friendly competition among exhibitors and speakers for the fastest, largest and best when it comes to the performance of computers and networks. "Speed has always been important, otherwise we wouldn't need the computer," said Seymour Cray, who built some of the world's fastest supercomputers during his career.

It's in this spirit that the conference's HPC (high performance computing) games are run. This year's games introduce a new challenge, pitting performance against price: The $10K Computer Challenge.

Participants are being asked to build or assemble their own high-performance computing machine (or machines) worth up to $10,000, and bring these machines to the SC2000 exhibition floor to compete, running a series of predetermined benchmarks of computer performance. The benchmarks will exercise an assortment of metrics covering CPU performance, disk performance and network performance, and various combinations of these metrics as seen in typical high-performance applications.

"If you're up to the challenge - the $10K Challenge - now's the time to get up to speed and enter the competition," said HPC Games co-chair James Arthur Kohl of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Web-based HPC Games application, along with rules for qualification and scoring, can be found at www.sc2000.org/games. A gzipped tar file of benchmark source code is now ready for download at: http://www.epm.ornl.gov/~kohl/HPC.GAMES/hpcg1.0.tar.gz

"And have no fear, if you are ultimately unable to get one or more benchmarks to run without massive failure on your bleeding edge system, it will not be held against you," said HPC Games Co-Chair Eleanor Anne Schroeder of the Naval Oceanographic Office. "Our objective is to see what can be accomplished within limitations and still have fun. So, we've decided to let participants omit any troublesome benchmarks as long as they notify us before the conference. The latest benchmark submission results can be obtained in real-time on line at: www.epm.ornl.gov/~kohl/cgi-bin/HPC.GAMES/score.cgi.

SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.


UP-AND-COMING IT FIRMS INVITED TO SHOW THEIR STUFF (AT NO CHARGE) ALONGSIDE INDUSTRY HEAVYWEIGHTS AT NOVEMBER CONFERENCE IN DALLAS
 

September 28, 2000

DALLAS, Texas - This November, the world's leading manufacturers and researchers in the field of high-performance computing and networking will gather here to present their latest hardware, software and research results at the SC2000 conference. This year's conference features a new Venture Village exhibit area, aimed at allowing up-and-coming information technology firms to exhibit their wares to a leading-edge audience.

Exhibit space in the Venture Village is available at no charge to the participating companies. Firms already on the village roster include KnowledgePort Alliance, Entropia, Alibre, Chiaro Networks, CenterPointe Ventures, United Devices, NoInk Communications and NetGen Learning Systems.

"The world of high-performance computing and networking is constantly being reinvented, with yesterday's upstarts becoming today's industry leaders," said Dennis Duke, chair of the Venture Village program. "That cycle seems to be never-ending and we want this year's conference to provide a platform for the emerging firms which could already be shaping the future of information technology."

This year's conference will be held Nov. 4-10 in the Dallas Convention Center. For more information about the SC2000 conference, go to http://www.sc2000.org. To learn more about participating in Venture Village, send email to .

The SC2000 conference combines three days of technical presentations, four days of technological demonstrations and exhibits and a weeklong educational outreach program. The Venture Village will be located strategically on the main exhibit floor, and will offer a village atmosphere where the estimated 5,000 conference attendees can meet with the venture companies and/or colleagues.

SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.


NOTED COMPUTER DESIGNER STEVEN WALLACH SELECTED AS KEYNOTE SPEAKER FOR SC2000 CONFERENCE IN DALLAS
 

October 4, 2000

DALLAS, Texas - In the fast-paced world of high performance computing, where the biggest, the fastest and the newest are merely transitory claims, the list of trailblazing pioneers is relatively short and stable.

One of those who made his name early on is Steve Wallach, whose career has included successful stints ranging from computer designer to entrepreneur, from corporate manager to venture capitalist. And now he has been selected at the keynote speaker at SC2000, the conference of high-performance networking and computing. Registration is now open for SC2000, which will be held Nov. 4-10 in the Dallas Convention Center.

Wallach's keynote address will look at "Petaflops in the Year 2009," peering into the future when supercomputers will perform quadrillions of calculations per second (petaflops). Wallach will assess both the technological characteristics and the likely marketplace realities that will govern progress toward the petaflops goal. As one of only a handful of computer engineers who have ever built a successful supercomputer (in terms of design and sales), Wallach will combine his engineering insight with his business acumen to present the pathway to the next generation of supercomputers.

"The SC conference has always attracted the leading drivers of high-performance computing and networking, and we are especially honored to have someone of Steve's stature serve as our keynote speaker this year," said Louis Turcotte, chair of SC2000. "Steve's credentials range from innovative computer designer to successful business entrepreneur to respected advisor for top-level government technology initiatives, and we think his view of the future will be a compelling kickoff to the conference."

Wallach achieved early fame as a hardware engineer for Data General Corp. His contributions to the 32-bit Eclipse MV superminicomputer series team at Data General are chronicled in the best-selling 1981 Pulitzer Prize winner, "The Soul of a New Machine" by Tracy Kidder. Following his work at Data General he co-founded the successful high-performance computing company Convex Computer. Hewlett-Packard purchased Convex in 1995 and Wallach became Chief Technology Officer at H-P. During his 15 years at Convex/H-P Wallach became recognized as one of the true pioneers of high-end computer engineering, receiving more than 30 patents related to supercomputing.

In 1997 Wallach became a principal advisor to CenterPoint Venture Partners and Sevin-Rosin Funds - leaders in venture capital funding of technology companies. While still active with CenterPoint and Sevin-Rosin, Wallach has recently increased his commitments by returning to the excitement of building a new company, Chiaro Networks, where he is serving as vice president of technology.

He is also a consultant to the U.S. Department of Energy for its Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative program. Wallach's career includes membership on the President's Information Technology Advisor Committee (PITAC), membership in the National Academy of Engineering, serving as visiting Friedkin Professor of Management at Rice University, and serving on numerous advisory boards for universities and national laboratories. He holds both bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering and a master's in business administration.

SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.


COMPUTER PERFORMANCE EVANGELIST GORDON BELL TO SPONSOR AWARDS FOR BEST COMPUTER CLUSTERS AT SC2000 CONFERENCE
 

October 10, 2000

DALLAS, Texas - For many computer system engineers, building a faster computer is a reward in itself. But at this year's SC2000 conference of high performance computing and networking, there is an additional incentive for those who can build the best computer cluster for under $10,000.

Gordon Bell, a noted designer and advocate of cost-effective multiprocessor computers, is sponsoring cash awards for the top performers in the conference's HPC Games. There will be a "Grand Prize Winner" for the team with the best all-around benchmark performance, and there will be several other prizes for "Fastest Cluster" (best performance on parallel benchmarks), "Fastest Single Node" (best performance on serial benchmarks), and "Most Innovative" for the best revolutionary design or unique approach. This year, SC2000 will be held Nov. 4-10 in Dallas.

The HPC, or High Performance Computing, Games have been a hallmark of the SC conference and bring a spirit of friendly competitiveness to an important objective - finding new ways to get the best performance out of computer systems. This year's games add a new twist to the quest for high-performance scientific computing by putting a ceiling on the cost of the computer hardware to be used. This year's high-performance computing challenge requires teams to construct the fastest computer cluster possible for under $10,000.

Time is short, but there is still plenty of room for more teams to join the "Battle of the Benchmarks." Potential challengers must have a booth in the SC2000 exhibit hall, and must bring their machines to the floor to compete. However, there are no other restrictions as to the design of each team's cluster.

Competitors will bring cluster machines to their exhibit booth at SC2000 and run an extensive suite of pre-selected serial and parallel benchmark programs to see who has the fastest CPUs, memory, network and I/O (input/output), and the best overall combination for scientific computing.

Teams can borrow machines or have them donated, or they can pool together existing PCs, workstations or cluster nodes to assemble a system, as long as the retail value as of Nov. 1, 2000, is under the $10,000 limit. Please check the HPC Games web page www.sc2000.org/games for more information and the official rules.

Bell, who is currently a senior researcher in Microsoft's Telepresence Research Group and a computer consultant-at-large who devotes time to startup ventures, has been designing computers for 35 years. His interest in multiprocessors began in 1965 with the design of Digital's PDP-6 computer, one of the first multiprocessor computers and the first timesharing computer.

Since 1988, Bell has recognized the most significant achievements in applying high-performance computers to scientific and engineering problems by sponsoring annual cash prizes for those who post the best performance on a supercomputer and those who achieve the best price-performance calculations. The awards are presented at the end of each year's SC conference.

SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.


SUPERCOMPUTING CONFERENCE TO KICK OFF TWO-YEAR, $2 MILLION PROGRAM TO TRAIN TEACHERS IN USING COMPUTERS AS A SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY TOOL IN THE CLASSROOM
 

October 18, 2000

DALLAS - With support from federal research agencies, professional associations and leading hardware and software manufacturers, a new program to train teachers from around the country in new ways to apply computers to solving scientific problems in the classroom will be launched in November at SC2000, the annual conference of high performance networking and computing.

Supporters of the program are the National Science Foundation, Association for Computing Machinery, Compaq Computer Corporation, High Performance Systems, IEEE Computer Society, Microsoft Corporation, NASA, Shodor Education Foundation and Wolfram Research. The program will be launched on Nov. 4 when SC2000 convenes in the Dallas Convention Center. The conference continues through Friday, Nov. 10.

The program, initiated under a $1.13 million grant from the National Science Foundation, will bring together 25 teams of four teachers each for a week of immersive training at SC2000 followed by monthly seminars and a Summer Institute the following summer in Huntsville, Alabama. A second group of 25 4-teacher teams will begin a similar training program at SC2001 next year in Denver. The results of the project will be a comprehensive set of classroom modules that follow national education standards and are available to all high schools across the country.

Thanks to a donation of state-of-the-art laptop computers from Compaq Computer Corp., the teachers will literally receive hands-on training in using computers to facilitate scientific research in the classroom. The teachers will take the computers back to their schools after the week of training to continue participation in the 18-month program. This project will also utilize the modeling package Stella from High Performance Systems, Excel from Microsoft Corporation, and Mathematica from Wolfram Research as modeling and simulation building blocks for the classroom. The program is designed to incorporate computational science, an emerging method of scientific investigation that complements the traditional methods of theory and experimentation. Computational science allows researchers to test theories through computer modeling and simulations and then check the accuracy of their work by comparing the results with those of laboratory experiments.

The participating teacher teams were selected earlier this year and represent 18 states: Alabama, Alaska, California, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Tennessee, Texas and Washington, along with a U.S. Department of Defense school for military dependents in Germany. The teams are mainly composed of high school teachers, and 44 percent of the teams come from lower-income areas. More than half of the teams represent schools with high minority populations, and about two-thirds are from rural school districts.

SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.


SC2000 CONFERENCE BUILDING MASSIVE NETWORK CONNECTIVITY INFRASTRUCTURE INTO DALLAS CONVENTION CENTER
 

November 1, 2000

DALLAS, Texas - Many people who attend conferences say they go for the networking. But the 5,000 computing and networking experts expected to attend the SC2000 conference on Nov. 4-10 really mean it - and will have access to one of largest, most complex communications networks in the nation, offering a combined capacity more than 167,000 times faster than a typical residential Internet connection and 200 times as fast as the connections used by many universities.

And, the high-performance computing and networking demonstrations scheduled for the week-long conference are expected to use every bit of the networking capability as they showcase the latest achievements in supercomputing and computational science.

This year, SC2000, the conference of high performance networking and computing, will convene in the Dallas Convention Center for seven days of technical programs, technological demonstrations and exhibits, educational outreach and mind-boggling visualizations of computational data.

But such high speed capability isn't just for show - many of the participants at the SC conference are suppliers or users of the world's most powerful computers, and the ability to quickly and reliably move large amounts of data across networks is essential to advancing scientific research in the United States and around the world.

Already, networking experts from around the country are working in Dallas to assemble the huge data "pipeline" consisting of three OC-48 lines, three OC-12 lines and other network connections for the conference. The massive, albeit temporary, conference network is known as SCinet and operates more than 80 miles of fiber optic cables installed specifically for this event.

"Because the SC conference is centered around the latest achievements in high-performance computing, it's only fitting that we build one of the world's biggest networks to support it," said Bill Kramer, who is heading up SCinet this year. "At last year's conference in Portland, SCinet provided more connectivity than all the combined networking resource in the states of Oregon and Washington - and this year's version of SCinet will be even bigger, faster and more technically complex."

Providing the main networking connections will be Qwest Communications International Inc., which has a significant fiber optic network in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Qwest also installed permanent fiber for the Dallas Convention Center, enabling future events to leverage the advanced broadband capabilities of Qwest backbone.

"Qwest is pleased to provide high-speed local broadband access to our worldwide Internet network to the SC2000 conference, enabling the demonstration of advanced bandwidth-intensive applications such as HDTV," said Augie Cruciotti, president of Qwest Local Broadband Services. "This is a great opportunity to showcase the industry-leading broadband infrastructure that we provide on a daily basis to such technologically demanding customers as the Department of Energy, the U.S. Mint and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency."

In addition to Qwest, the roster of vendors and research organizations contributing to SCinet reads like a high-tech Who's Who: Aaronsen Group, APC, Abilene Internet2 Network, Acturna, Advanced Technology Demonstration Network, Argonne National Laboratory (DOE), Army Research Laboratory (DOD), Avici Systems, Best Power, Caltech, CISCO Systems, the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), Extreme Networks, Foundry Networks, GST Telecom, Hewlett-Packard, High Speed Connectivity Consortium (DARPA), Juniper Networks, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (DOE), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (DOE), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Marconi, MITRE Corporation, National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NSF), National Transparent Optical Network (NTON), Netscout, Northeast Regional Data Center/University of Florida, Nichols Research/CSC, Nortel Networks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (DOE), Optical Cable Corp., Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (DOE), Qwest Link, San Diego Supercomputer Center/NPACI, Sandia National Laboratories (DOE), SBC Data Comm, Spirent Communications, Sun Microsystems, Supernet (DARPA), Texas A&M University, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Major Shared Resource Center (DOD), University of California, University of Northern Texas, University of Tennessee/Knoxville, the Very high performance Backbone Network Services-vBNS+ (NSF), and WorldCom.

For the first time in the history of the SC conference, SCinet will also be providing wireless networking capability throughout the Dallas Convention Center. This will allow conference attendees to connect with SCinet from anywhere on the show floor or in any of the technical program areas. (For details, go to www.scinet.sc2000.org/wireless.php3)

To ensure that the 100 teachers participating in SC2000 Education Program also have wireless connectivity, Cisco Systems and SBC Communications have donated wireless cards for computers and NCSA and Internet2 have loaned the necessary base stations. (To learn more about the SC2000 education program, go to www.sc2000.org/media/releases.htm#13.)

To get an idea of the connectivity provided by SCinet, here's a comparison with typical Internet connections. A person who uses a dialup ISP at home typically connects at best at 56 kilobits per second (Kbps), or 56,000 bps. A DSL line will usually speed things up to 256 Kbps (or perhaps 640 Kbps in some areas). A DS-3 connection, such as those serving many universities, offer speeds up to 45 megabits (45 million bits) per second. SCinet's three OC-48 (for Optical Carrier) lines will each have a capacity of 2.5 gigabits (2.5 billion) per second. Combined with three OC-12 lines (each at 622 million bits per second), SCinet will offer a combined peak speed of 9.4 gigabits per second.

This year's conference is also sponsoring a competition for high-bandwidth applications, each of which is expected to completely saturate the network's capability as data from high-performance computing applications is accessed, manipulated and visualized at the conference.

And if that isn't enough, SCinet also supports an experimental Xnet, a bleeding-edge network which showcases early access equipment that may not yet be formally supported by vendors. This year, SCinet is showcasing technologies such as 10-G Ethernet as part of Xnet.

SC2000 is sponsored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Architecture.

For more information about SCinet, go to www.sc2000.org/scinet.


TEAMS SATURATE NETWORK IN HIGH-BANDWIDTH APPLICATIONS COMPETITION AT SC2000 CONFERENCE - EXCEED 1 GIGABIT PER SECOND DATA TRANSFER
 

November 15, 2000

DALLAS, Texas - In a competition to demonstrate high-bandwidth applications and push the limits of network capacity, two teams posted peak performance figures of more than a gigabit of data per second, with the winning team achieving peak performance of 1.48 gigabits per second.

The SC2000 Network Challenge for Bandwidth-Intensive Applications was held Tuesday night and Wednesday at SC2000, the conference of high performance networking and computing. Eleven teams rose to the challenge when it was announced in April. After spending months getting ready, they each had one hour to move as much data as possible across SCinet, the conference network.

On Thursday afternoon, the conference simultaneously ran all the bandwidth challenges, as well as other communication-intensive applications. The SCinet team measured all of the traffic moving in and out of exhibit areas and the total aggregate rate exceeded five gigabits per second throughout the hour. This is about 100,000 times more data than a typical residential connection can handle.

The competition produced winners in three categories and three "outstanding runners-up," each receiving a cash prize donated by Qwest Communications International, Inc.

"Qwest is pleased to encourage and reward such demanding applications and to demonstrate the capabilities and services we are providing to such scientific networks as the Department of Energy's ESnet," said Wesley Kaplow, Qwest's chief technology officer for government systems. "This was a good opportunity for us to get in synch with our customers as we collectively tackle the problems of breaking the bandwidth bottleneck."

Winning the "Fastest and Fattest" category for overall best performance was a team from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory demonstrating Visapult, a prototype application and framework for remote visualization of terascale datasets. The Visapult team recorded a peak performance level of 1.48 gigabits per second over a five-second period.

Taking top honors in the "Hottest Infrastructure" category was a team representing the University of Southern California/Information Sciences Institute and Argonne, Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories running "A Data Management Infrastructure for Climate Modeling Research." The team demonstrated its infrastructure for secure, high-performance data transfer and replication for large-scale climate modeling data sets and achieved a peak performance level of 1.03 gigabits.

The winner in the "Most Captivating and Best Tuned" category was a team representing Stanford University/Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Internet2, Deutsche Telekom and Stanford Networking. This application uses Quality of Service routing to send data across the country and back to provide real-time music recording and playback.

Outstanding runners-up were Project DataSpace, an infrastructure for remote and distributed data access, analysis and mining; Development of a Telescience Portal, a Web-based system for performing biological experiments using remote instruments and computing resources; and Scalable High-Resolution Wide Area Collaboration over the Access Grid, a system to support group-to-group interaction across the Grid..

According to Ian Foster of Argonne National Laboratory, who initiated the challenge, "The general idea was that participants would propose ideas for amazing applications that would both overwhelm the SCinet network infrastructure and to showcase technologies and do things they couldn't do elsewhere. We were delighted with what the competitors managed to do."

The network performance was measured both by each team and by the SCinet staff. The entries were judged by an eight-member panel of international experts who have a stake in the success of such applications.

"Science is increasingly dependent on networking, with the people, data and facilities dispersed around the country and the globe and this was an exciting chance to demonstrate what leading applications can do when they have access to advanced networks and services," said Mary Anne Scott, a program manager in the DOE Office of Science, and one of the judges.


SC2000 CONFERENCE CAPPED ONE OF BIGGEST YEARS EVER WITH AWARDS AND RECOGNITION
 

November 15, 2000
Note: Updated, complete version posted Nov. 21, 2000.

DALLAS, Texas - SC2000, the conference of high performance networking and computing, capped one of the most successful programs in the history of the conference by recognizing outstanding achievements and contributions in the field.

The awards were presented Thursday, Nov. 9, honoring a wide range of people and their accomplishments. The conference drew 5,065 registered attendees and 153 exhibitors for a week of demonstrations, technical presentations, informal discussions and an extensive educational program.

"Whether we judge the conference by attendance, passing comments in the aisles or the overflowing audiences for presentations, this has been one heck of a successful week," said Louis Turcotte, general chair of the SC2000 conference. "SC2000 added to the very successful foundation of the conference as the SC2001 team starts planning for next year's program in Denver."

The IEEE Computer Society, a cosponsor of the conference, presented two special awards.

The first, the Sidney Fernbach Award, was presented to Stephen W. Attaway [photo] of Sandia National Laboratories. The award is given for an outstanding contribution in the application of high performance computers using innovative approaches. Attaway is an engineer who works in the field of computational mechanics for crash and impacts. He has worked at Sandia National Laboratories since 1987 and is currently a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff in the Computational Solid Mechanics and Structural Dynamics Department. Attaway was named a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in March 2000.

The second award, the second annual IEEE Computer Society Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, presented in recognition of innovative contributions to high performance computing systems that best exemplify Seymour Cray's creative spirit, was given to Glen J. Culler [photo]. In 1961, he and physicist Burton Fried developed the first interactive, mathematically based graphical system - allowing scientists to visualize computational solutions in real-time. During his career, Culler developed the array processor, digital speech processing and the personal supercomputer. This award includes a $10,000 honorarium and is funded from an endowment provided by SGI.

Each year at SC, the Gordon Bell Prize is awarded for the best peak computer performance, the best performance-price ratio and in a special category.

Competitors for this year's prize for best performance tied, each achieving 1.34 teraflops. Tetsu Narumi, Ryutaro Susukita, Takahiro Koishi, Kenji Yasuoka, Hideaki Furusawa, Atsushi Kawai and Thoshikazu Ebisuzaki [photo] recorded 1.34 Tflops with their Molecular Dynamic Simulation for NaCl for a Special Purpose Computer: MDM. The team of Junichiro Makino, Toshiyuki Fukushige and Masaki Koga [photo] achieved1.349 Tflops with their Simulation of Black Holes in a Galactic Center on GRAPE-6.

The winners of the Price/Performance Category were Douglas Aberdeen, Jonathan Baxter and Robert Edwards [photo] for their 92 cents/Mflops Ultra-Large Scale Neural Network Training on a PIII Cluster.

Honorable Mention in the Price/Performance Category went to Thomas Hauser, Timothy I. Mattox, Raymond P. LeBeau, Henry G. Dietz and P. George Huang [photo] of the University of Kentucky for their "High-Cost CFD on a Low-Cost Cluster."

In the Gordon Bell Prize special category, Alan Calder, B.C. Curtis, Jonathan Dursi, Bruce Fryxell, G. Henry, P. MacNeice, Kevin Olson, Paul Ricker, Robert Rosner, Frank Timmes, Henry Tufo, James Truran and Michael Zingale [photo] were cited for their High-Peformance Reactive Fluid Flow Simulations Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Thousands of Processors.

Here is a list of other awards presented at the conference:

  • Best Paper: "Is Data Distribution Necessary in OpenMPI?," Constantine Polychronopoulos, Dimitrios Nikolopoulos, Eduard Ayguade, Jesus Labarta and Theodore Papatheodorou [photo].
  • Best Student Paper: "A Comparison of Three Programming Models for Adaptive Applications on the Origin 2000," Hongzhang Shan [photo], Princeton University.
  • Best Research Gem: "Automatic TCP Window Tuning Implemented in an FTP Application," Jim Ferguson and Jian Liu.
  • HPC Games Most Leading Edge Technology Prize: Jeff Moe, Jim Waggett, Kai Staats and Roy Jenevein [photo] for Black Lab Linux.
  • HPC Games Most Innovative Hardware Prize: Bill Dieter, Hank Dietz, Jim Lumpp, Thomas Hauser, Tim Mattox and Todd Willey [photo] for The Aggregrate.
  • HPC Games Grand Prize: James Hanna, Peter Hsieh, Robert Hillman, Walter Koziarz, Wilmar Sifre and Zen Pryk [photo] for The Red Team.
  • HPC Games Most Innovative Software Prize: James Hanna, Peter Hsieh, Robert Hillman, Walter Koziarz, Wilmar Sifre and Zen Pryk [photo] for The Red Team.

A new competition sponsored by Qwest Communications International and called the SC2000 Network Challenge for Bandwidth-Intensive Applications pushed the limits of the conference's SCinet network as two teams [fastest team photo and the best infrastructure team photo] posted peak performance figures of more than a gigabit of data per second.

Next year's SC2001 conference will be held Nov. 12-15, 2001, in Denver, Colorado.